Grade 4

Crosswalk Analysis

NAAEE Guidelines End
of Grade 4

NH
Science Curriculum Frameworks-End of Grade 4

NH
Social Studies Curriculum Frameworks-End of Grade 4

Strand 1- Questioning, Analysis and Interpretation Skills

 

 

A) Questioning– Learners are able to
develop questions that help them learn about the environment and do simple
investigations.

·
Identify questions they
are likely to be able to answer by combining their own observations and
investigations of the environment with existing information.

·
Pose questions based on
experiences in their own community and local environment as well as from
other sources, such as journalistic reports about the environment.

·
Generate ideas and
questions about objects, organisms, events, places, and relationships in the
environment.

SPS1:4:1.7 Ask questions about objects, organisms and events in their
local environment.

 

SPS1:4:1.8 Pose questions to investigate and practical problems to
solve.

 

S:SPS3:4:2.2
Develop questions based upon their observations about the natural
world and design a simple investigation.

 

S:SPS3:4:2.3
Develop questions that help them learn about the environment; and
design and conduct simple investigations.

 

S:SPS4:4:4.1
Ask questions and plan investigations to find answers.

None at this level

B) Designing investigations- Learners
are able to design simple investigations.

·
Predict possible answers
to their own questions, developing and discussing simple alternative
hypotheses.

·
Design ways of answering
questions based on systematic observations. For example, devise a way to
learn about the life cycle of a caterpillar or the means of transportation
that children take to and from their school.

·
Design simple experiments
to answer questions and test ideas they have about the environment.

SPS1:4:2.1 Plan a
step-by-step process to solve a practical problem or to carry out a “fair
test” or a simple scientific question.

 

SPS1:4:2.2 Select an
activity and justify it as an effective means of collecting appropriate data.

 

S:SPS4:4:6.1Plan and conduct a scientific investigation
in group settings.

None at this level

C) Collecting Information- Learners
are able to locate and collect information about the environment and
environmental topics.

·
Observe and record
characteristics, differences, and change in objects, organisms, events,
places, and relationships in the environment.

·
Find, assess, select, and
use resources such as atlases, data bases, charts, tables, graphs and maps.

·
Use basic field skills,
such as observing, interviewing and measuring, to collect information.

·
Use tools such as rulers,
thermometers, watches, scales, magnifiers, and microscopes to make
observations and measurements.

·
Use computers,
calculators and other devices to conduct investigations and manipulate
information.

SPS1:4:1.1 Extend the
senses using simple tools.

 

SPS1:4:1.2 Make and
record observations for a given purpose.

 

SPS1:4:1.4 Record
observations using standard units of measurement.

 

SPS1:4:4.1 Compile and
display data in a variety of formats.

 

SPS1:4:4.2 Select an
appropriate format to represent data or observations.

 

S:SPS3:4:2.4Locate and collect information about the
environment and environmental and natural resources topics.

 

S:SPS4:4:1.2Use appropriate tools to measure and graph
data.

 

S:SPS4:4:7.1Keep a journal record of observations,
recognizing patterns, summarizing findings, and reflecting on the
observations.

 

S:ESS4:4:2.1
Demonstrate the use of simple instrumentsto collect weather data, including
thermometers, windsocks, meter sticks, and rain gauges.

 

S:LS5:4:2.1Demonstrate the use of appropriate tools
and simple equipment, such as thermometers, magnifiers and microscopes to
gather data and extend the senses.

Skill 2.1:A3 Draw on the
diversity of social studies-related sources, such as auditory and visual
sources, such as documents, charts, pictures, architectural works and music.

 

Skill 2.1:B7 Utilize
various types of sources such as documents, charts, images, artifacts and
maps.

 

Skill 2.1:D Students will
be able to carry out a variety of information-gathering techniques.

D) Evaluating accuracy and reliability– Learners understand the need to use reliable information to answer
their questions. They are familiar with some basic factors to consider in
judging the merits of information.

·
Provide specific examples
of information they believe to be factual, fictitious, or of questionable
merit and explain their reasoning.

·
Identify some factors
that might influence the credibility of a specific source of information, for
example who created it, how old it is, and what kind of arguments or evidence
are used.

SPS2:4:1.2 Realize that
the results of similar scientific investigations seldom turn out exactly the
same, but if the differences are large it is important to try to figure out
why.

 

SPS2:4:1.3 Know when
comparisons might not be fair because some conditions are not kept the same.

None at this level

E) Organizing information– Learners
are able to describe data and organize information to search for
relationships and patterns concerning the environment and environmental
topics.

·
Summarize observations
and describe data.

·
Construct, read, and
interpret maps, graphs, tables, diagrams, and other displays of data.

·
Identify patterns in
events, designs, organisms, and sets of numbers.

·
Describe mathematical
relationships and use those relationships as a way of organizing data.

SPS1:4:4.3 Identify and
suggest possible explanations for patterns.

 

SPS1:4:4.4 Analyze data
and identify discrepancies.

 

S:SPS3:4:2.6Organize information to search for
relationships and patterns concerning the environment and environmental
topics.

 

S:SPS4:4:3.3Organize observations and data into tables,
charts and graphs.

Skill 2.2:F1 Group data
in categories according to appropriate criteria

 

Skill 2.2:F2 Place in
proper sequence, i.e., in order of occurrence, including in timelines, or in
order of importance, etc.

 

Skill 2.2:F3 Place data
in tabular form: charts, graphs and illustrations.

F) Working with models and simulations– Learners understand that relationships, patterns and processes can
be represented by models.

·
Interpret information and
situations by noting associations and similarities and recognizing patterns,
trends, relationships and sequences.

·
Give examples of models
or simulations and how they can be used to learn about what they represent.
Identify ways in which a model differs from what it represents.

·
Use a number of types of
models such as geometric figures, graphs and maps to summarize observations
of the environment.

SPS2:4:3.1 Know that
seeing how a model works after changes are made to it may suggest how the
real thing would work if the same changes were done to it.

 

SPS2:4:3.2 Use geometric
figures, number sequences, graphs, diagrams and pictures as scientific
models.

 

SPS2:4:3.3 Recognize that
most everything has limits on how big or small it can be.

Skill 2.2:F3 Place data
in tabular form: charts, graphs and illustrations.

G) Drawing conclusions and developing explanations- Learners develop simple explanations that address their questions
about the environment.

·
Summarize information,
compare findings and use basic mathematics to analyze data.

·
Identify information that
is not relevant to a proposed explanation and explain their reasoning.

·
Use models and examples
to explain their thinking.

·
List strengths and
weaknesses of the explanations they propose.

SPS1:4:5.1 Cite evidence
or data to support conclusions.

 

SPS1:4:5.2 Determine if
an observation or measurement supports a given scientific explanation.

 

SPS1:4:5.3 Draw a
conclusion to answer an initial question, based on the evidence collected.

 

S:SPS4:4:2.1Use a variety of tools and formats (oral
presentations, journals, and multimedia presentations) to summarize and
communicate the results of observations.

 

S:SPS4:4:4.2Compile data gathered through observations
to record and present results using tally charts, tables and graphs.

 

S:SPS4:4:4.3Use evidence to construct explanations.

Skill 2.2:G4 Form opinion
based on critical examination of relevant information.

 

Skill 2.2:G7 Take into
account when interpreting events or behaviors context of their time and
place.

 

Skill 2.2:I1 Secure
needed factual information relevant to making he
decision.

 

Skill 2.2:I4 Justify
interpretation by citing evidence.

NAAEE Guidelines-End of
Grade 4

NH Science Curriculum Frameworks-End
of Grade 4

NH Social Studies
Curriculum Frameworks-End of Grade 4

Strand 2- Knowledge of
Environmental Processes and Systems

 

 

2.1- The Earth as a
Physical System

 

 

A)     Processes that shape the
Earth
– Learners are able to
identify changes and differences in the physical environment.

·
Identify some of the forces that cause erosion within their own
region, pointing out factors such as freezing and thawing, wind, waves and
gravity.

·
Identify some distinctive landforms within their region and, using
maps and images, in other areas of the world.

·
Differentiate among climates, considering factors such as
precipitation, temperature and resident plants and animals and how they form
the different biomes. Understand that the ocean is a major influence on
weather and climate no matter where.

·
Observe and record seasonal differences.

S:ESS1:4:5.1
Identify and describe processes that affect the features of the
Earth’s surface, including weathering, erosion, deposition of sediment.

SS:GE:2: Places and
Regions
Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic
features that define places and regions as well as how culture and experience
influence people’s perceptions of places and regions.

 

SS:GE:3: Physical Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of they physical
processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface and the characteristics
and spatial distribution of ecosystems.

B) Changes in matter– Learners are able to
identify basic characteristics of and changes in matter.

·
Describe objects in terms of the materials they are made of and their
observable properties.

·
Identify the effects of factors such as heating, cooling, and moisture
on the properties of materials and how quickly change happens.

·
Describe the basic elements of the hydrologic cycle (including the
role of the ocean) and geologic processes (including weather, erosion and
deposition). Locate examples of these in the local environment.

S:ESS1:4:5.2
Explain how wind, water, or ice shape and reshape the Earth’s surface.

 

S:ESS1:4:6.3
Identify minerals by their physical properties, such as color, texture
and cleavage, and describe simple tests used in the identification process.

 

S:ESS1:4:6.4
Use results from an experiment to draw conclusions about how water
interacts with earth materials (e.g., percolation, erosion, frost heaves).

SS:GE:3: Physical Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of they physical
processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface and the characteristics
and spatial distribution of ecosystems.

 

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

C) EnergyWhile they
may have little understanding of formal concepts associated with energy,
learners are familiar with the basic behavior of some different forms of
energy.

·
Identify different forms of
energy including radiant light, geothermal, electrical, and magnetic energy.

·
Identify examples of these
different forms in their homes, school, community, and natural environment.

·
Explain some of
the ways in which heat, light, or electricity are produced, travel, stored
and used. Use examples such as the sun, power generation, batteries, and so
forth.

S:PS2:4:1.1Recognize that energy has the ability to
create change.

 

S:PS2:4:3.1Identify the various forms of energy, such
as electrical, light, heat, sound.

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

Strand 2.2- The Living
Environment

 

 

A)     Organisms,
populations, and communities—
Learners understand basic
similarities and differences among a wide variety of living organisms. They
understand the concept of habitat.

·
Identify similarities and differences among
living organisms ranging from single-celled organisms they can observe under
microscopes to plants and animals they encounter through direct observation,
videos, books, or other media.

·
Classify or group organisms using categories such
as how animals bear their young, anatomical features, or habitats.

·
Describe the basic needs of all living things and
explain how organisms meet their needs in different types of environments
such as deserts, lakes, or forests.

S:LS1:4:1.2Sort/classify different living things using
similar and different characteristics; and describe why organisms belong to
each group or cite evidence about how they are alike or not alike.

 

S:LS1:4:2.3Identify and explain how the physical
structures of an organism (plants or animals) allow it to survive in its
habitat/environment (e.g., roots for water; nose to smell fire).

 

S:LS1:4:2.4Identify the basic needs of plants and
animals in order to stay alive (i.e., water, air, food, space).

SS:GE:3: Physical Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of they physical
processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface and the characteristics
and spatial distribution of ecosystems.

 

B)
Heredity and evolution—
Learners understand that plants and
animals have different characteristics and that many of the characteristics
are inherited.

·
Identify some basic traits of plants and animals.
Give examples of how those traits may vary among individuals of the same
species.

·
Identify some similarities among offspring and
parents as being inherited and others as resulting from the organism’s
interactions with its environment.

·
Compare fossil
life forms and living organisms to identify similarities and differences
between organisms that lived long ago and those alive today.

S:LS3:4:3.1Recognize that individuals of the same
species differ in their characteristics; and explain that sometimes these
differences give individuals an advantage in survival and reproduction.

None at this level

C)
Systems and connections—
Learners understand basic ways in which
organisms are related to their environments and to other organisms.

·
Describe ways in which an organism’s behavior
patterns are related to its environment. Identify examples of environmental
change and discuss how these changes may be helpful or harmful to particular
organisms.

·
Identify ways in which organisms (including
humans) cause changes in their own environments. Create a skit that shows how
these changes may help or harm both the organisms that caused the change and
other organisms.

·
Identify ways in which organisms are
interdependent.

S:LS2:4:1.2Describe the interaction of living
organisms with nonliving things.

 

S:LS2:4:3.2Describe ways plants and animals depend on
each other (e.g., shelter, nesting, food).

 

S:LS3:4:1.3Using information (data or scenario),
explain how changes in the environment can cause organisms to respond (e.g.,
survive there and reproduce, move away, die).

SS:GE:3: Physical Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of they physical
processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface and the characteristics
and spatial distribution of ecosystems.

 

SS:GE:4: Human Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of human migration; the complexity of
cultural mosaics; economic interdependence; human settlement patterns; and
the forces of cooperation and conflict among peoples.

 

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

D)
Flow of matter and energy—
Learners know that living things need
some source of energy to live and grow.

·
Explain how most living organisms depend on the
sun as the source of their life energy. Give examples that illustrate the
understanding that animals ultimately depend on plants for this energy and
that plants depend on the sun. Use this idea to trace the energy in the food
they eat for lunch back to the sun.

·
Describe how matter can be recycled, sometimes in
a changed form from the original material. Use examples from their own
experience, such as fleece jackets made from recycled soda bottles or
envelopes made from recycled telephone books. Or make their own recycled
paper and explain how the use of matter differs between making recycled paper
and new (or “virgin”)paper.

·
Explain the
process of life, growth, death, and decay of living organisms as a form of
recycling. For example, use a compost pile to study recycling of organic
materials.

S:ESS2:4:2.1
Recognize that the Sun provides the light and heat necessary to
maintain the temperature of the Earth.

 

S:ESS4:4:3.1
Distinguish between and provide examples of materials that can be
recycled/reused and those that cannot.

 

S:ESS4:4:3.3
Explain how to dispose of waste so that it does not harm the
environment.

 

S:LS2:4:2.2Recognize that energy is needed for all
organisms to stay alive and grow or identify where a plant or animal gets its
energy.

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

Strand 2.3- Humans and
Their Societies

 

 

A)     Individuals
and groups
—Learners understand that people act as
individuals and as group members and that groups can influence individual
actions.

·
Give examples of influences on individual
behavior, particularly behavior that affects the environment.

·
Consider influences such as financial costs,
convenience, laws, and the opinions of friends and family members.

·
Identify some of the many groups that a person
can belong to at the same time. Describe some tensions that a person might
feel as a result of belonging to different groups.

·
Discuss why students might belong to school or
after school clubs (such as environmental clubs or scouting troops).

·
Consider
personal benefits (such as fun and learning) as well as good things the clubs
do for the whole school or community.

None at this level.

Skill 2.3 Real World
Applications of Social Studies Skills

J
Students will develop personal skills.

K
Students will develop civic participation skills.

 

SS:CV:1: The Nature and
Purpose of Government

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the
fundamental ideals of government of the United States.

B) Culture—Learners
understand that experiences and places may be interpreted differently by
people with different cultural backgrounds, at different times, or with other
frames of reference.

·
Describe their favorite place or their own
community from a variety of perspectives, including their own.

·
Role-play the reactions of different people to a
place or historical event—especially one with local significance.

·
Compare how people live in different regions and
how different cultures meet basic human needs. For example, prepare a visual
display that compares how people support themselves in different regions and
discuss how those livelihoods can both affect the environment and depend on
the environment.

None at this level.

SS:GE:2: Places and
Regions
Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic
features that define places and regions as well as how culture and experience
influence people’s perceptions of places and regions.

 

SS:GE:4: Human Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of human migration; the complexity of
cultural mosaics; economic interdependence; human settlement patterns; and
the forces of cooperation and conflict among peoples.

 

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

SS:HI:4: Economic Systems
& Technology

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the changing forms of production,
distribution and consumption of goods and services over time.

 

SS:HI:5: Social/Cultural

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the interaction of various social
groups, including their values, beliefs and practices, over time.

 

SS:WH:4: Economic Systems
& Technology

Students
will demonstrate their understanding of the changing forms of production,
distribution and consumption of goods and services over time.

C) Political and
economic systems—
Learners understand that government and
economic systems exist because people living together in groups need ways to
do things such as provide for needs and wants, maintain order, and manage
conflict.

·
Discuss what might happen if there were no laws
to protect the environment in their area. Consider possible positive and
negative effects on plants and animals, specific natural areas, landowners,
specific businesses, water users, and others.

·
List jobs in their community that are linked to
processing natural resources. Identify clusters of related businesses and
interview employees or owners to determine why those economic activities are
located in their community.

·
Identify elements of infrastructure (e.g.
communications and transportation systems) in their community. For example,
create a map or a skit showing how information, people, and goods move from
place to place. Include information about who is responsible for, or who pays
for, this infrastructure (e.g., the government, private business,
individuals).

S:ESS4:4:4.1
Identify some jobs/careers that require knowledge and use of Earth
science content and/or skills.

 

S:LS5:4:4.1Identify some jobs/careers that require
knowledge and use of life science content and/or skills.

 

S:PS4:4:4.1Identify some jobs/careers that require
knowledge and use of physical science content and/or skills.

SS:CV:1: The Nature and
Purpose of Government

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the
fundamental ideals of government of the United States.

 

SS:EC:1: Economics and
the Individual

Students
will learn about their role in a free market, how decisions that they make
affect the economy, and how changes in the economy can affect them.

 

SS:EC:4: Financial
Institutions and the Government

Students
will understand how financial institutions and the government work together
to stabilize our economy, and how changes in them affect the individual.

 

SS:EC:5: International
Economics and Trade

Students
will recognize the importance of international trade and how economies are
affected by it.

 

SS:GE:4: Human Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of human migration; the complexity of
cultural mosaics; economic interdependence; human settlement patterns; and
the forces of cooperation and conflict among peoples.

 

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

D) Global
connections—
Learners understand how people are
connected at many levels—including the global level— by actions and common
responsibilities that concern the environment.

·
Identify ways in which individual needs and wants
are related to environmental concerns such as energy use, conservation and
environmental protection.

·
Describe how trade connects people around the
world and enables them to have things they might not be able or willing to
produce themselves. For example, create a map that shows where a learner’s
food, clothing and household items are produced, where the raw materials come
from, products that are traded into and out from their region, and so forth.

·
Identify possible environmental concerns that
might come up in other regions or countries as a result of producing or
shipping products that learners use regularly.

·
Discuss how television, computers, and other
forms of communication connect people around the world.

None at this level.

SS:EC:2: Basic Economic
Concepts

Students
will learn about the pillars of a free market economy and the market
mechanism.

 

SS:EC:5: International
Economics and Trade

Students
will recognize the importance of international trade and how economies are
affected by it.

 

SS:GE:4: Human Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of human migration; the complexity of
cultural mosaics; economic interdependence; human settlement patterns; and
the forces of cooperation and conflict among peoples.

 

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

 

SS:WH:2: Contacts,
Exchanges & International Relations

Students
will demonstrate their understanding of the interactions of peoples and
governments over time.

 

SS:WH:4: Economic Systems
& Technology

Students
will demonstrate their understanding of the changing forms of production,
distribution and consumption of goods and services over time.

E) Change and
conflict—
Learners recognize that change is a
normal part of individual and societal life. They understand that conflict is
rooted in different points of view.

·
Identify aspects of family and community life
that have remained constant over generations, as well as aspects that have
changed. For example, interview family or community members and develop a visual
display about their findings.

·
Give examples of rules related to the environment
at home, in school, or elsewhere that have changed and others that have
stayed the same.

·
Identify some basic ways in which individuals,
groups, and institutions such as schools resolve conflict concerning the
environment. For example, develop and perform short skits about different
ways of solving a school problem such as littering on the playground or in
hallways.

None at this level.

Theme A: Conflict and
Cooperation

 

Theme E: Cultural
Development, Interaction and Change

 

SS:CV:1: The Nature and
Purpose of Government

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the
fundamental ideals of government of the United States.

 

SS:GE:4: Human Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of human migration; the complexity of
cultural mosaics; economic interdependence; human settlement patterns; and
the forces of cooperation and conflict among peoples.

 

SS:WH:1: Political Foundations
and Developments

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of major events, ideas and issues
pertaining to the history of governance.

Strand 2.4-
Environment and Society

 

 

A)     Human/environment
interactions—
Learners understand that people depend
on, change, and are affected by the environment.

·
Identify ways in which people depend on the
environment. For example, create an artistic representation of how the
environment provides food, water, air, recreation, minerals, and other
resources.

·
Identify ways in which human actions change the
environment. For example, list changes that activities such as building
houses or stores with parking lots, farming, or damming rivers have caused
within their community or region.

·
Describe how the environment affects human
activities in their community or region. For example, describe the effects of
weather or climate, the likelihood of earthquakes or flooding, soil and
mineral types, or the presence of water on where people live, how they make a
living, how they recreate, and so forth.

None at this level.

SS:GE:2: Places and
Regions
Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic
features that define places and regions as well as how culture and experience
influence people’s perceptions of places and regions.

 

SS:GE:3: Physical Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of they physical
processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface and the characteristics
and spatial distribution of ecosystems.

 

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

B) Places—Learners
understand that places differ in their physical and human characteristics.

·
Identify and describe places in their region that
they or others think are important. For example, draw pictures, create a
video, or take photographs that illustrate what people find unique or
important about regional landmarks, downtown areas, parks, farms, wilderness
areas, and so forth.

·
Discuss how humans create places that reflect
their ideas, needs, and wants, as well as the physical environment.
Illustrate with examples of places within their experience such as
playgrounds, parks, classrooms, and homes.

·
Compare their neighborhood or town with another
nearby place, or compare their favorite park with another park they know.
List characteristics that make one place different from another.

None at this level.

SS:CV:4: Rights and
Responsibilities

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of
citizenship, and the ability to apply their knowledge of local, state, and
national government through the political process and citizen involvement.

 

SS:GE:2: Places and
Regions
Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic
features that define places and regions as well as how culture and experience
influence people’s perceptions of places and regions.

C) Resources—Learners
understand the basic concepts of resource and resource distribution.

·
Explain what a natural resource is and give
examples.

·
Distinguish among resources that are renewable
and nonrenewable, and resources (like running water or wind) that are
available only in certain places at certain times.

·
Identify ways they use resources in their daily
lives.

·
Locate sources of various resources on a map. For
example, trace the origins of the local water supply or map the region’s
natural resources.

·
Link patterns of human settlement and other
activity with the presence of specific resources such as mineral deposits,
rivers, or fertile farming areas. Research the origins of their own community
and explain the role of resource availability on how the community developed.

None at this level.

SS:EC:2: Basic Economic
Concepts

Students
will learn about the pillars of a free market economy and the market
mechanism.

 

SS:GE:1:The World in
Spatial Terms

Students
will demonstrate the ability to use maps, mental maps, globes, and other
graphic tools and technologies to acquire, process, report and analyze
geographic information.

 

SS:GE:3: Physical Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of they physical
processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface and the characteristics
and spatial distribution of ecosystems.

 

SS:GE:4: Human Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of human migration; the complexity of
cultural mosaics; economic interdependence; human settlement patterns; and
the forces of cooperation and conflict among peoples.

 

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

D) Technology—Learners
understand that technology is an integral part of human existence and
culture.

·
Describe technologies as tools and ways of doing
things that humans have invented. Give examples of technologies that affect
their lives in areas such as transportation, communications, and
entertainment.

·
Interview family members or community members to
trace technological changes that have taken place over the last three
generations.

·
Identify drawbacks and benefits of specific
technologies. Consider the fact that technologies can benefit some humans and
other organisms while harming others.

·
Identify important technological systems such as
agriculture, transportation, and manufacturing.

S:SPS3:4:3.2Describe how people have designed and used
tools throughout history; and provide examples of how many of these tools,
while improved, are still in use today.

 

S:SPS3:4:3.3Provide examples illustrating that
throughout history, people of all ages and from all walks of life have made
significant contributions to the fields of science and technology.

SS:HI:4: Economic Systems
& Technology

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the changing forms of production,
distribution and consumption of goods and services over time.

 

SS:WH:4: Economic Systems
& Technology

Students
will demonstrate their understanding of the changing forms of production,
distribution and consumption of goods and services over time.

E) Environmental issues—Learners
are familiar with some local environmental issues and understand that people
in other places experience environmental issues as well.

·
Discuss some local environmental issues by
identifying some changes or proposals that people disagree about. Describe or
role-play how different people feel about these changes and proposals.

·
Discuss how people in other places with similar
conditions might react or perceive the situation in similar ways.

S:SPS3:4:2.7Identify and investigate issues in their local
environments and communities.

SS:EC:5: International
Economics and Trade

Students
will recognize the importance of international trade and how economies are
affected by it.

 

SS:GE:3: Physical Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of they physical
processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface and the characteristics
and spatial distribution of ecosystems.

 

SS:GE:5: Environment and
Society

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the connections and consequences of the
interactions between Earth’s physical and human systems.

NAAEE Guidelines-End of
Grade 4

NH Science Curriculum
Frameworks-End of Grade 4

NH Social Studies
Curriculum Frameworks-End of Grade 4

Strand 3- Skills for
Understanding and

Addressing Environmental
Issues

 

 

Strand 3.1- Skills for
Analyzing and Investigating Environmental Issues

 

 

A) Identifying and
investigating issues—
Learners are able to identify and
investigate issues in their local environments and communities.

·
Identify and describe a current or historical
environmental issue in their community.

·
Use primary and secondary sources of information
to explore the dilemma confronting people in a current or historical
situation that involves the environment.

·
Apply ideas of past, present, and future to local
environmental issues. For example, describe what has changed, is changing,
and could change or discuss how long the issue has existed.

·
Identify people and groups that are involved.

·
Identify some of the decisions and actions
related to the issue.

S:SPS3:4:2.7Identify and investigate issues in their
local environments and communities.

Skill
2.1:B1 Distinguish between primary and secondary sources.

 

Skill
2.1:B7 Utilize various types of sources such as documents, charts, images,
artifacts and maps.

 

SS:HI:5: Social/Cultural

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the interaction of various social
groups, including their values, beliefs and practices, over time.

B) Sorting out the consequences of issues—As
learners come to understand that environmental and social phenomena are
linked, they are able to explore the consequences of issues.

·
Observe and speculate about social, economic, and
environmental effects of environmental changes and conditions, and proposed
solutions to issues. For example, describe short- term and long-term effects
of existing uses of land or another resource in the home, community, and
region.

·
Discuss how an environmental issue affects
different individuals and groups.

None at this level.

SS:GE:2: Places and
Regions
Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the physical and human geographic
features that define places and regions as well as how culture and experience
influence people’s perceptions of places and regions.

 

SS:GE:3: Physical Systems

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of they physical
processes that shape the patterns of Earth’s surface and the characteristics
and spatial distribution of ecosystems.

C) Identifying and evaluating alternative
solutions and courses of action—
Learners understand there
are many approaches to resolving issues.

·
Identify proposed solutions to an issue and
discuss arguments for and against them. Explain why various strategies may be
effective in different situations, and that each proposed strategy is likely
to have a different effect on society and the environment. Illustrate with
examples from a specific issue.

·
Describe some of the different levels at which
action can be taken–for example by individuals, families, school classes,
different levels of government, or businesses. Identify ways that these
groups might take action on a specific issue.

·
Propose alternative approaches to problems.

S:SPS3:4:2.7Identify and investigate issues in their
local environments and communities.

Skill
2.2:I2 Identify alternative sources of action and predict likely consequences
of each.

 

Skill
2.3:K Students will develop civic participation skills.

D) Working with flexibility, creativity,
and openness—
Learners understand the importance of
sharing ideas and hearing other points of view.

·
Engage in critique and discussion as part of the
process of inquiry. Explain why these processes are important.

·
Hear and respect different perspectives and
communicate with people whose lives, cultures, and viewpoints are different
from their own.

·
Identify ideas and interpretations that differ
from theirs. Ask questions about different perspectives and discuss their
strong points and drawbacks.

S:SPS3:4:1.2Communicate ideas to others.

 

S:SPS3:4:1.3Give specific feedback about work of
others.

 

S:SPS4:4:6.2Engage in group decision making activities.

Skill
2.2:H Students will be able to present information in a variety of ways.

 

Skill
2.3:J Students will develop personal skills.

 

Skill
2.3:K Students will develop civic participation skills.

Strand 3.2-
Decision-Making and Citizenship Skills

 

A) Forming and evaluating personal views—Learners
are able to examine and express their own views on environmental issues.

·
Identify and express their own ideas about
environmental issues and alternative ways to address them.

·
Test their views against what they know and
believe, remaining open to new information and ideas.

·
Identify unanswered questions.

·
Identify, clarify, and express their own beliefs
and values regarding the environment.

None at this level.

Skill
2.2:I Students will be able to make informed decisions.

 

Skill
2.3:J Students will develop personal skills.

B) Evaluating the need for citizen action—Learners
are able to think critically about whether they believe action is needed in
particular situations and whether they believe they should be involved.

·
Discuss whether citizens should take action on a
particular environmental issue. Consider findings from their issue
investigations such as causes of the problem and promising strategies for
addressing it.

·
Identify types of citizen action appropriate for
a specific issue.

·
Discuss whether and how they think they would
like to be involved. Identify reasons for and against taking specific kinds
of action.

None at this level.

Skill
2.3:K Students will develop civic participation skills.

 

SS:CV:1: The Nature and
Purpose of Government

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the fundamental
ideals of government of the United
States.

C) Planning and taking action—By
participating in issues of their choosing-mostly close to home-they learn the
basics of individual and collective action.

·
Develop action plans they can carry out
individually, in small groups, or as a class. Include clear reasons and goals
for action. Consider the results of their environmental issue investigation
and their assessment of the need for action.

·
Set realistic goals for action and measures of
success consistent with learners’ abilities.

·
Decide whether their plan should be implemented
immediately or at another time, changed, or abandoned; and carry through with
action when appropriate.

S:SPS3:4:2.1Demonstrate a basic conservation action
such as recycling or a schoolyard habitat project.

Skill
2.3:J Students will develop personal skills.

 

Skill
2.3:K Students will develop civic participation skills.

D) Evaluating the results of actions—Learners
understand that civic actions have consequences.

·
Describe the apparent effects of their own
actions and actions taken by other individuals and groups.

·
Discuss some of the reasons why identifying the effects
of actions may be difficult. Consider, for example, the time required to see
effects, the influences of others’ actions, and other changes in the
situation.

None at this level.

Skill
2.3:J Students will develop personal skills.

 

SS:CV:4: Rights and
Responsibilities

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of
citizenship, and the ability to apply their knowledge of local, state, and
national government through the political process and citizen involvement.

NAAEE Guidelines-End of
Grade 4

NH Science Curriculum
Frameworks-End of Grade 4

NH Social Studies
Curriculum Frameworks-End of Grade 4

Strand 4- Personal and
Civic Responsibility

 

 

A) Understanding
societal values and principles—

Learners can identify fundamental
principles of U.S.
society and explain their importance in the context of environmental issues.

·
Identify examples of beliefs that many U.S. citizens
hold in common, such as the importance of individual property rights, the
right to pursue happiness, the public or common good, and the well-being of
future generations. Create a skit that explores why people might decide to
act on environmental issues, considering possible connections with these
basic beliefs.

·
Discuss how their own beliefs about the
environment, environmental issues, and society compare to these general,
societal beliefs.

·
Recognize tensions that occur when basic values
and beliefs differ. Illustrate with examples from local environmental issues.

None at this level.

Theme A: Conflict and
Cooperation

 

Skill
2.3:J Students will develop personal skills.

 

Skill
2.3:K Students will develop civic participation skills.

 

SS:CV:4: Rights and
Responsibilities

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of
citizenship, and the ability to apply their knowledge of local, state, and
national government through the political process and citizen involvement.

B) Recognizing
citizens’ rights and responsibilities—

Learners understand the
basic rights and responsibilities of citizenship.

·
Identify examples of the personal, political, and
economic rights of U.S.
citizens.

·
Identify examples of the responsibilities of
citizenship.

·
Discuss rights and responsibilities in the
context of local environmental issues.

 

SS:CV:4: Rights and
Responsibilities

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of
citizenship, and the ability to apply their knowledge of local, state, and
national government through the political process and citizen involvement.

C) Recognizing efficacy—Learners
possess a realistic self-confidence in their effectiveness as citizens.

·
Describe ways in which individuals and groups act
within their community to protect the environment. Identify cases where
citizen action has had an effect on an environmental decision or action.

·
Identify ways in which they have made a
difference through their own actions. Give examples from situations over
which learners have some control (for example, in the classroom, at home, or
in the community) and that are appropriate to their level of understanding.

None at this level.

Skill
2.3:K Students will develop civic participation skills.

 

SS:CV:4: Rights and Responsibilities

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of
citizenship, and the ability to apply their knowledge of local, state, and
national government through the political process and citizen involvement.

D) Accepting personal responsibility—Learners
understand that they have responsibility for the effects of their actions.

·
Identify and describe some of the effects that
they and the groups they belong to (e.g., family or school class) have on the
environment and on humans and other living beings.

·
Discuss the notion of responsibility and identify
some of their personal responsibilities.

S:SPS3:4:1.1Be able to complete an assigned task when
given a specific role in a group.

Skill
2.3:K Students will develop civic participation skills.

 

SS:CV:4: Rights and
Responsibilities

Students
will demonstrate an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of
citizenship, and the ability to apply their knowledge of local, state, and
national government through the political process and citizen involvement.

 

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